Point of View: Mercury scare hurts low-income kids
If you’re tuned in to all the heated discussion about fish and mercury, you’ve absorbed at least one basic message from environmental groups and the federal government: “Our children are at risk.” Guess what? They’re right. But not the way
 Top 10 Species: Wild salmon
Alaska’s salmon runs started out slow, but ended higher than expected. But that’s not the biggest news in the wild salmon industry right now. Because of supply and pricing issues in recent years, the species and product forms of Pacific
 Retail Report: Scallops backbone of retail mollusk category
Whether “wet” (treated with a preservative) or “dry” (untreated), U.S. retail scallop sales are slowly increasing. Within the mollusks category, scallops represented 3 percent of seafood department sales nationwide during the 52 weeks ending June 28 and accounted for
 Opah
Fifteen or so years ago if an opah was cau g ht as bycatch it would have most likely been tossed overboard. The market for opah wasn’t generated until the early 1990s, when the state of Hawaii challenged chefs to
 Return to the kitchen
Clay Conley’s menu reads like an itinerary of where he’s been and the products he’s cooked with. Born in Limerick, Maine, and now the chef at Miami’s award-winning Azul in the Mandarin Oriental hotel, Conley’s career path has taken him
 Bargain hunters
Retailers are constantly strategizing to meet consumers’ ever-changing palates, dietary requirements and convenience needs. But this year a lagging economy and soaring fuel prices are forcing consumers to reassess the way they buy food. Shoppers are dining out less, trimming
 Get used to changes in China
The recent Olympics in Beijing gave China a chance to showcase its remarkable economic progress to 4 billion people around the world. Those fortunate Olympic attendees saw glittering new skyscrapers and shopping centers. The swarms of black bicycles that once
 Tilapia
With China’s position as the world’s largest tilapia producer, importers openly admit they were scrambling after a winter freeze there killed off a large portion of the farmed fish. “When we were first aware of the freeze, we scoured the
 Good to be Kings
For half a day every month, Kings Super Markets Seafood Director Tony Ruccio visits one of the Parsippany, N.J.-based chain’s 26 stores to work with part-time associates on how to properly fillet and steak fish, shuck oysters and clams, bake
 Despite the economy, Kings has had positive seafood sales and customer counts.

Despite the economy, Kings has had positive seafood sales and customer counts.